Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN) In the Management of Autoimmune Conditions

Conventional Naltrexone

What is Naltrexone?
Naltrexone is a drug that is typically used at “full” dose for opioid addiction or overdose. When naltrexone is taken at a much lower dose, patients with autoimmune conditions may experience significant benefits in symptom reduction, improved lab markers, and slowed or reversed disease progression. The therapeutic dose of low-dose Naltrexone for autoimmune conditions is typically between 3.0mg – 4.5mg. Conditions that may benefit from LDN include: lupus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s, ulcerative colitis, MS, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, celiac, psoriasis, Sjogren’s, scleroderma.

How does LDN work?
Low doses of Naltrexone taken at temporarily block your opioid receptors. This signals your brain that your levels are low, then your body responds by ramping up the production of endorphins. This surge of endorphins (and opiate receptors) can modulate your immune system and decrease autoimmune symptoms.

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