Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN) In the Management of Autoimmune Conditions

Conventional Naltrexone

What is Naltrexone?
Naltrexone is a drug that is typically used at “full” dose for opioid addiction or overdose. When naltrexone is taken at a much lower dose, patients with autoimmune conditions may experience significant benefits in symptom reduction, improved lab markers, and slowed or reversed disease progression. The therapeutic dose of low-dose Naltrexone for autoimmune conditions is typically between 3.0mg – 4.5mg. Conditions that may benefit from LDN include: lupus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s, ulcerative colitis, MS, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, celiac, psoriasis, Sjogren’s, scleroderma.

How does LDN work?
Low doses of Naltrexone taken at temporarily block your opioid receptors. This signals your brain that your levels are low, then your body responds by ramping up the production of endorphins. This surge of endorphins (and opiate receptors) can modulate your immune system and decrease autoimmune symptoms.

Continue reading “Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN) In the Management of Autoimmune Conditions”

The Onco-Metabolic State: How to Make Your Body Less Hospitable to Cancer

We are often told in medicine that cancer cells are a single cell that “went bad” and started making copies of itself without all the normal mechanisms that limit reproduction and promote adhesion. We know now that this is not entirely right. Cancer cells are primarily ones that have lost the ability to repair breaks and mutations in their DNA. In this way, they begin a kind of accelerated evolution and become a diverse set of rapidly changing (i.e. evolving) cells with different properties, and adapted to environments that promote cancer growth and inhibit the immune cells that would normally kill cancer cells. The conditions under which cancer cells generally thrive in can be called “The Onco-Metabolic State”. Continue reading “The Onco-Metabolic State: How to Make Your Body Less Hospitable to Cancer”